Special Issue

  • Reporting Afghanistan

    War Veteran Draws Comparisons Between The Soviet Union and Canada

    Shortly after Nikolai Lanine immigrated to Canada in 2000, he again found himself a citizen of a country that was waging war on a place he left over 12 years ago. At 18-years-old, Lanine was drafted into the Soviet army. He served in Afghanistan for 16 months until the Soviets withdrew in February of 1989—just over nine years after the war began.

  • Extending Canada’s Longest War

    Liberal MP Defends Canada’s Decision to Remain in Afghanistan until 2014

    For Canadians, June 2011 was supposed to mark the end of the war in Afghanistan.

    However, in November of last year, the Harper government announced that after the withdrawal of combat troops from Afghanistan this summer, 950 Canadian troops would remain in country to help train police and military forces.

  • Space:  The final frontier

    Seeing Dollar Signs In Space, The Government Pulls Back

    Where outer space once resembled the Old West—an unknown territory of tremendous danger and immeasurable opportunity

  • Quartier Concordia

    Reimagining Student Space At Concordia University

    An international student stands outside of the Hall Building looking lost. He asks a stranger where Concordia is. The stranger points up at the Hall, to the EV, the MB and the GM Buildings.

  • A Tale of Two Student Centres

    The 50 Year Battle for Student Space on Campus

    The Daytime Student Association of Sir George Williams University started collecting a fee levy of $5 per year at registration in 1965 for a Student Centre

  • Skateboarding in a Hostile City

    Fifteen minutes into a midnight skate session with friends at Peace Park last summer, a homeless man hassled me into doing a kickflip for him. I relented with a pop and a flick, and let my board spin around once.

  • Accepted Act, Broken Culture

    “Legal walls are a plague.”

  • Streams of Information

    The End of the Newspaper’s Monopoly and How it Intends to Survive

    Every year, fewer people pick up issues of the newspaper you are holding.

  • Free To Be

    We understand that every issue is unique as it pertains to our chosen identity, our gender, our spirituality and the ways in which we express ourselves.