Montreal Police Take to Streets in Protest

Loud and Unapologetic, SPVM Wants More

  • Last night, thousands of off duty Montreal police officers came to disrupt the city’s 375th anniversary celebrations. Photo Gabriel Fizer

  • Last night, thousands of off duty Montreal police officers came to disrupt the city’s 375th anniversary celebrations. Photo Miriam Lafontaine

  • Last night, thousands of off duty Montreal police officers came to disrupt the city’s 375th anniversary celebrations. Photo Gabriel Fizer

  • Last night, thousands of off duty Montreal police officers came to disrupt the city’s 375th anniversary celebrations. Photo Gabriel Fizer

  • Last night, thousands of off duty Montreal police officers came to disrupt the city’s 375th anniversary celebrations. Photo Jérémie Gauthier-Caron

  • Last night, thousands of off duty Montreal police officers came to disrupt the city’s 375th anniversary celebrations. Photo Jérémie Gauthier-Caron

Police protesting, that’s not something you see too often.

Last night, thousands of off duty Montreal police officers came to disrupt the city’s 375th anniversary celebrations.

The Montreal Police Brotherhood has been without a collective bargaining agreement since December of 2014. Since then, they have been striking for fairer pension plans and for more rights in the negotiation process with the municipal government.

They began their protest by their offices on Gilford St. in the Mile-End, and continued on down Ste. Denis St. Along the way police unapologetically blew their horns and whistles, and as a result, were frequently met with boos from onlookers.

They stopped their march at City Hall in the Old Port around 9 p.m.. Soon after president of the brotherhood, Yves Francœur, stepped to the podium.

“We’re saying it can’t continue like this, you cannot continue stealing our pensions,” he said. “And our rights to negotiate.”

In April, Public Security Minister Martin Coiteux announced that police officers still found wearing camo pants would be faced with fines. With limited options in showing their displeasure, the ban on “clown pants” is leaving the brotherhood frustrated.

“You and Coiteux asked us to find a different way of showing our displeasure. Well, this tonight is our first way,” said Francœur, as the crowd cheered.

“The Montreal Police is falling into ruin, we’re constantly asked to do more with less,” he continued.

They went on to end their protest at the dock by the Jacques Cartier Bridge, which was in the midst of being lit up in celebration of Montreal’s 375th birthday.

From there, they took up flashlights to disrupt the light show for onlookers who came to see the fireworks and the new bridge.

Last update at 4:30 p.m.

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