Concordia Bomb Threat Suspect Targeting Muslim Students Out on Bail

Accused to Undergo Psychiatric Evaluation

  • Hisham Saadi is charged with mischief, uttering threats and inciting fear for a terrorist related attack. 10 years would be the maximum sentence. Photo Brian Lapuz

After a week of postponements and deliberations, Hisham Saadi, the man arrested in connection to last week’s Concordia University bomb threats, will be free upon meeting bail requirements, as ruled at Palais de justice this afternoon.

Hisham Saadi’s acquaintances will have to pay a total of $10,000 for his release.

“We are many family members and friends who are ready to lend Mr. Saadi our support,” said a friend of Saadi in French, under the media’s promise of anonymity outside the courtroom. “We are 100 per cent satisfied [with the ruling].”

Saadi’s friend also mentioned that this is the first time that Saadi has done anything to put him at the centre of such attention.

“Mr. Saadi is lucky to have these kind of people around him,” said defense lawyer Caroline Braun, outside the courtroom of yesterday’s hearing.

He will now have to keep a 100 meter distance between himself and any university, check into a Laval police station every Monday, and meet a curfew of 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. in a home in Laval, unless Saadi is in need of hospitalization. He will also have to go through psychiatric evaluation at the Philippe Pinel mental health institute, among other bail conditions.

His trial will be in late April.

Evidence presented at the hearing was subject to a publication ban, due to a request by the defence lawyer.

Saadi is charged with mischief, uttering threats and inciting fear for a terrorist related attack. 10 years would be the maximum sentence.

The threat, that was made in a letter, warned that small, homemade bombs would detonate on some floors of the Hall and EV buildings of Concordia’s downtown campus.

Saadi, a PhD student with no criminal record, was arrested early in the morning of his Cote-des-Neiges apartment on March 2, the day after the threats were made.

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