Fringe Arts

  • Folk Master Flex

    Indie-Folk Sextet The Head and the Heart Discuss Newfound Fame, Sophomore Record and Bebop Jazz

    The carefree acoustic melodies and whimsical chords of Seattle indie-folk band The Head and the Heart are an ideal soundtrack to the warm spring breezes now kissing the Montreal city streets, teasing the glowing summer nights to come.

  • Bad Business

    The ABCs of the Segal Centre’s New Production ‘Glengarry Glen Ross’

    The world of David Mamet’s classic Glengarry Glen Ross is one built on the power of words as weapons and glasses of hard whiskey. It’s a world where the single golden rule is ABC—Always Be Closing.

  • A Film Noir Disco Fantasy

    Jef Barbara Headlines Fundraiser for the Plateau’s Favourite Robot

    Fame and fortune sounds just fine to Jef Barbara, he’s just not in a rush to get there.

  • Primal Urges

    Progressive Indie Four-Piece Bend Sinister Followed their Instincts on New Record ‘Animals’

    For West Coast indie band Bend Sinister, walking through a park or down the street is like turning on National Geographic—the band is fascinated with the idea that humans are no different from the beasts in the wild, choosing to base their latest album on humanity’s primal nature.

  • Analog & Ironic

    The Found Footage Festival Resurrects Ridiculous VHS Tapes in Unique Comedy Show

    In the Internet age of whiny memes and re-posts galore, it can be hard to find fresh and original content. Enter the Found Footage Festival—a celebration of the weird, forgotten VHS tapes of a past era and home to some of the strangest footage on Earth.

  • Anatomy of a Strike

    Graphic Novelist Looks Back at Quebec Student Strike and Police Tactical Responses in New Book

    For American illustrator Sophie Yanow, being in Montreal during the Quebec student strike was pure happenstance.

  • If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say, Say It Anyway

    Literary Critics Come Together to Discuss Review Culture

    Literary critics who have crafted their reviews constructively and passionately have arguably made critique an art form in itself. The panel discussion What We Talk About When We Talk About Poetry this week at the Word bookstore aims to debate just that.

  • Be Very Afraid

    Youtheatre’s New Production Shines a Light on the Pathology of Obsession

    In a world filled up to the bloody brim with psychotic slasher films, increasingly graphic crime television, and the Internet’s leaked treasure trove of all things awful, the true definition of horror has been massacred. In light of these over-the-top depictions, what’s really scary is how far they can put us out of touch with reality.

  • A Symphony for Your Senses

    The SAT Presents a Visual Voyage Inspired by John Adams’ Orchestral Work

    Orchestral symphonies can sweep listeners away into faraway worlds with their atmospheric ballads, breathing inspiration and wonder with every note—and Montreal’s Société des Arts Technologiques wants to take that feeling to a literal level.

  • Cutting Back

    Local Artist Launches Print Booklet to Protest Police Brutality

    Art and political statements have always been a natural combination, from protest songs and demonstration performances all the way to state-smashing literature.